Ferrari TR

From Ferrari Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search
1958 250 Testa Rossa from the Ralph Lauren collection
1961 250 TR Spyder Fantuzzi Serenissima version from the Ralph Lauren collection
See also the 500 TR and Testarossa models.

The Ferrari TR, or 250 Testa Rossa, is a race car model built by Ferrari in the 1950's and 1960's. These cars dominated their arenas, with variations winning the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1958, 1960, and 1961. They were closely related to the rest of the Ferrari 250 line, especially the legendary 250 GTO.

In all, 34 250 Testa Rossas were built, from 1956 through 1961. The phrase "Testa Rossa" means "redhead." The most well known, the 250TR, was produced from 1957 to 1958; only 2 factory cars and 19 customer cars were built. After the 250 GTO, the 250 Testa Rossa is the second most valuable Ferrari model, often valued at more than USD8,000,000.

250 Testa Rossa


Named for the red valve covers, the original 250 TR had unorthodox bodywork by Scaglietti. The front fenders are visually separated from the central "nacelle" body, a design inspired Formula One racers, with air ducting across the front brakes and out through the open area behind the wheels, this model is often called the "Pontoon" TR. Olivier Gendebien and Phil Hill won the 24 Hours of Le Mans with this car in 1958.

250 TR


This aerodynamic design was controversial and successful in racing, but Ferrari began changing the look almost immediately. Other, more conventional bodies were designed by Ferrari stalwarts, Pininfarina and Carrozzeria Touring. The engine had the same displacement as the rest of the 250 series but was tuned to produce far more power. The front styling of the 250 TR61 pictured served as inspiration to the current Ferrari F430 road car.

The 250 TR lines of 1960 and 1961 were dominant racers - Olivier Gendebien took Le Mans again those two years, with Paul Frère in 1960 and Phil Hill in 1961.

Personal tools